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Stormwater: Carwashing

WHEN YOU'RE WASHING YOUR CAR IN THE DRIVEWAY, REMEMBER YOU'RE NOT JUST WASHING YOUR CAR IN THE DRIVEWAY.

All the soap, scum, and oily grit runs along the curb. Then it travels to the storm drain and directly into our streams, ponds and reservoirs. And that causes pollution, which is unhealthy for fish and other critters that need clean water. So how do you avoid this whole mess? Easy. Wash your car on grass or gravel instead of the street. Or better yet, take it to a car wash where the water is treated and recycled.

 

The Town of New Castle has a series of stormwater tips with advice for prevention of stormwater runoff and for protecting our environment. According the State Environmental Protection Agency, stormwater runoff occurs when precipitation from rain or snowmelt flows over the ground. Impervious surfaces like driveways, sidewalks, and streets prevent stormwater runoff from naturally soaking into the ground. Stormwater can pick up debris, chemicals, dirt, and other pollutants and flow into a storm sewer system or directly to a lake, stream, river, wetland, or coastal water. Anything that enters a storm sewer system is discharged untreated into the water bodies we use for swimming, fishing and providing drinking water.